Historical overview 2.

Internment

In 1945 internment as a means of compulsion in public administration was referred to the authority of the Police and later to that of the Political Police. Internment meant that people were deprived of their freedom and taken to internment camps without a court decision.

After the end of World War II several different detention camps worked in Hungary. In autumn 1946 the Act of the Minister of Home Affairs put an end to most of these internment camps in Budapest and in the country. A central detention camp was appointed. At that time the central camp was the Buda-dél Internment Camp and in the spring of 1949 the Internment Camp in Kistarcsa took over the central camp function.

Between 1945 and 1953 the Detention Houses (State Security Prison in Budapest, Mosonyi street) played an important part in the lives of both prisons and internees: the sentences of internment were made public here and the internees were carried to the camps from this place. One of the prison laundries and the prison hospital also worked here.

Internment camps in and around Budapest in 1945-1949
Internment camps in and around Budapest in 1945-1949

Camps (1950–1953)

In the early 1950s new sorts of camps were created such as penal servitude camps and closed camps for internees.
The Political Police played an important role in maintaining these camps. In those days the authorities wanted to control and terrorize every member of the society directly, even in private life. Anybody who was considered a potential enemy of the regime could land in a camp for convicts. No court decision was necessary for this; measures by the Political Police were sufficient.

Those who controlled the camps

After 1950 prisons and old and new internment and penal servitude camps came under the control of State Security. They were first run and controlled by the Legal and Prison Division of ÁVH and later by the Prison Division of the Inquiry Main Division.

Gyula Décsi (1919–1990) Colonel of State Security, the leader of the Legal and Prison Division of ÁVH in 1950 – ÁBTL 2.1. VI/5. Gyula Lőke (1914–?)  Lieutant Colonel of State Security, leader of the Prison Division of ÁVH, the person who received all reports from the internment camps – ÁBTL 2.8.1. – 3439.
Gyula Décsi (1919–1990) Colonel of State Security, the leader of the Legal and Prison Division of ÁVH in 1950 – ÁBTL 2.1. VI/5. Gyula Lőke (1914–?) Lieutant Colonel of State Security, leader of the Prison Division of ÁVH, the person who received all reports from the internment camps – ÁBTL 2.8.1. – 3439.
Tibor Vajda (1926–?) Major of State Security, who was a torturer originally and later became Deputy Leader of the Inquiry Main Division– ÁBTL 2.8.1. – 5976. A few barrack in the Recsk camp from the end of the 50’s – collection of Lívia Gyarmathy
Tibor Vajda (1926–?) Major of State Security, who was a torturer originally and later became Deputy Leader of the Inquiry Main Division– ÁBTL 2.8.1. – 5976. A few barrack in the Recsk camp from the end of the 50’s – collection of Lívia Gyarmathy
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